Project Space Pilipinas
founded: Manila, Philippine, 2007
Barter: Jason Dy, SJ

Barter: Jason Dy, SJ

Project Space Pilipinas (PSP) presents Barter as its parallel exhibition of the 2016 London Biennale MANILA Pollination. As an artist-led platform that develops traditional, alternative and emerging art approaches, PSP supports this socially oriented and collaborative art project conceived by artist and priest Jason Dy, SJ. Generally interested in responding to the changing religious and cultural circumstances, locations and events through his community and studio based art practices, Dy’s current art project is informed by socially engaged creative practices that attempts to break away from conventional modes of art exchanges, i.e. institutional and commercial, to propose an alternate route of engaging people who are at the peripheries of art discourse and interaction (cf. Decter, 2014, pp. 16-17).  Barter has evolved from initially responding to the incongruous government response to the El Niño stricken Kidapawan farmers last 1 April 2016 (as hinted by the rice scooper created from cut down 6-pounder shell casing, 57x306R, 1890s-WWI) to the specificity of the PSP’s exhibition space in Lucban as a site of multiple engagements and exchanges with artists, curators and the local community. The notion of barter, though treated as a “myth” as well as a “thought experiment” by several anthropologists that disagree that this kind exchange of goods was a precursor of money as popularly posited by 18th century Scottish philosopher Adam Smith (cf. Strauss, 2016), is proposed as discursive framework of reflecting on the multiplicity of interactions of the...
Under the Influence

Under the Influence

Working on histories of concrete and abstract structures of agencies, “Under the Influence” impresses on a kaleidoscope of socio-cultural inebriations. This exhibition is Leslie de Chavez’ re-mounting of selected artworks previously shown at the Lopez Memorial Museum under the group show “Complicated” and “Multiple Languages” at Silverlens Galleries. Hallucinating on pop and mass culture, de Chavez trips on the colonial past and the neoliberal present as he comments on issues concerning cultural imperialism, power struggle and...
First Lucban Assembly

First Lucban Assembly

The First Lucban Assembly titled PAMUMUHUNAN (Waiting for a capital) gathers networks and individuals in rural Southern Luzon to position how communal practices are translated into artistic method and strategies and other creative production, and to highlight how these ways of working show other relationships with the capital. In apprehending translation, the First Lucban Assembly operates in multiple folds of the alternative—being the dominant characterization of independent initiatives, self-organized cultural production, and non-institutional activities. It renders the production of arts and values within these ‘local’/’peripheral’ spaces as complicated yet functioning economic and political systems, which shape particular worlds and promote certain modes of existence. Here, the Assembly boldly claims translation, beyond process of transfer and relay, to be organization: expounding individualized and localized struggles and interrelating them with several subjects and sites. Thinking through relationship, the First Lucban Assembly reflects on the constitution and movement of relations mobilized by actors, brokers/mediators, visitors, authorities, and other incidental and conscious investors in different scales of ecological field. In staging a series of events for art, it finds the urgency to ask how communities have instituted both material and immaterial infrastructures, that continuously create an affective and cognitive network of doing/working. Then, the Assembly inaugurates the question in the cultural sector: Can we build an institution of desires and commitments in an insecure field, with limited access to state, market and private infrastructures? Hardly a thematic axis, PAMUMUHUNAN (Waiting for a capital) classifies the Assembly’s position as a draft—not based on art, but transposed from values and struggles of communities—in forming ways of connecting and organizing. It hopes to host different anxieties,...